Category Archives: deconstruction

Limestone unlimited

I was about to enter salvaging heaven!

The porch tear down only generated a limited amount of salvaged lumber, and we recycled the concrete foundation. The old limestone foundation, however, was something I have been salivating over for a while.

There was not a stone to be wasted here! This is priceless garden material. But we first had to disassemble it stone by stone.

Well, the excitement about the limestone was a little muted once we started with the demolition. The material was a lower quality than that of the building foundation. A lot of the larger stones separated along the sediment lines into smaller, thinner slabs. This was particularly prevalent at the location of the old downspout where the hydrostatic pressure had built up.

We found the biggest and best quality stones in the two corners. It was at times a challenge to lift them out of the pit. All of the salvaged stones, large and small, are now waiting for their new garden assignment.

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Cracking concrete until the foundation falls

Our old back porch was special in many ways — just not in a positive way. For instance, it had two foundations. One was an old limestone foundation wall (more on that later), and the other was a reinforced concrete foundation in front of it.

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The concrete foundation was added sometime in the past 10 to 15 years to stabilize the limestone foundation behind it, which had started to buckle inwards. And this demonstrates the power of water and the importance of properly working drainage.

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The buckle in the limestone foundation had its apex where the downspout met the sewer pipe. At one point that sewer pipe must have been cracked or broken, and probably blocked, behind the limestone foundation. Water rushing down the downspout didn’t drain but rather started saturating the soil behind the limestone foundation. The frequent hydrostatic pressure started to push the foundation inwards.

I could tell that the broken sewer tile had been replaced and the concrete wall poured to tame the buckle.

Our job for the day was to remove the concrete foundation.

There wasn’t much to salvage or recycle from the old porch. The concrete, however, is a sought after commodity. There are recycling stations that take it and process it into recycled aggregate.

Similar to the basement floor, I may end up getting part of my own concrete back when I install the recycled aggregate base for the new concrete floor under the new porch.

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Back porch tear down

I had scheduled the removal of that eyesore that was attached to the back of our building – our old back porch – back in late March. We had to wait for the snow to clear but finally proceeded with the cosmetic surgery.

The surgeon’s tools of choice: Crow bars, sawzall, large scrapers and sledge hammers.

Revealing

It got interesting from the get go!

The first job was to separate the porch roof from the main roof. The crew cut through the existing roofing and began to scrape it off.

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We knew the porch was in bad shape and not safe. But I now got to see what “not safe” meant, as the decking along the porch edge was partially rotten. That’s the kind of skylight you don’t want!

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Looking at the cross section of the roofing threw me back to the deconstruction days of our deep energy retrofit, when I felt like I was conducting an archaeological dig, peeling back the construction layer by layer.

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We have an impressive 2 ½ inches of very old, pretty old, not so old, and newer roofing on our building. One layer after another. Can you imaging the weight of this? If I assume 90 pound roll roofing at ?” per layer, we have a least 18 pounds of roofing per square foot. That is about ¾ the weight of an extensive green roof!

Destruction

One and a half days, and our eyesore was gone, including the clean up.

Why is it so much fun to watch this planned destruction? It was fun watching it while it was in process, and I still have a blast revisiting the time lapse. Or even just this little video of the west wall coming down.

Waste reduction?

I spent some time walking through the old porch, looking for items that could be salvaged, reused, repurposed, recycled or otherwise diverted from the landfill. Because pretty much everything was painted, the majority of the porch was in a non-recyclable state. I managed to pull out a handfull of items, such as a door and some two by fours, along with a number of floor joists and some nice posts. I’ll either find a use for them or see if I can find a taker, despite the paint on the lumber.

The one thing that surprised me is that our contractor fit the whole porch into two trailers, with which he hauled it off site. I would have ordered a big dumpster, and it would only have been half full.

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Terminating the temporary

I mentioned the old grease trap in the back porch. It was a hot mess back in 2010 when I cleaned it up. The intent at the time was to temporarily re-purpose it as a sump pit.

 

 

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Back then, I connected the interior perimeter drains to it. We also terminated and stubbed the new sewer lines, which allowed me to install and connect a sump pump.

This temporary band-aid has lasted long enough. With the old back porch being torn down sometime soon, I had a sense of urgency to demo the old grease trap. Before I could do that, I had to install a new and proper sump pit. And before I got to that, I had to rip out the old concrete floor.

That put me back into recycling mode. We threw the concrete chunks into the back of my truck and hauled them to the recycling company down the street at Kedzie and I55.

Next step: Getting the excavator and starting to dig.

Related posts:

The back porch project

Grease trap cleaning

Nail biter

Perimeter drain installation

Finished sewer

Where did all the concrete go

Basement windows

I got on a roll—the window roll, that is. And I’d better be, because there is still a lot to take care of regarding the windows…specifically the basement windows.

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Some of them are the original 100-plus-year-old windows, which are falling apart. Some have been replaced once with single pane double hung windows, but the jambs are still original, and show a lot of rot. There is nothing to salvage here. I have the privilege to rip out the entire window assembly down to the brick opening. The job involves a sawzall to cut the jambs, and a hammer, pry bar and a lot of dust.

What are we putting back into the opening? High efficiency double hung replacement windows.

I would have preferred casement or awning windows, because they usually have a lower air leakage rate and better energy performance. The problem is that both those styles open outwards, which would interfere with the exterior security guards.

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Hopper or tilt-and-turn windows would have been another option, but I couldn’t find these styles as high performance windows or at the right price point. So we are settling on the double hung which do not interfere with the guards.

Our research led us to Uniframe and Serious products, which fall within our energy performance parameters.

Once I have framed the brick opening with a new buck and once I can take the final measurements for the replacement windows, I will request pricing for both and take it from there.