Pot rack

Let me try something very different today: This is my attempt to write up a recipe using only leftovers.

We have a very nice and useful collection of cooking pots and cast iron pans, but they’ve begun to clutter up our kitchen. That sparked the idea for a recipe with left-overs. Here we go:

Ingredients:

  • Salvaged old growth stud scraps (preferably close to a 100 years old)
  • Leftover 5/8 inch poplar dowels
  • Leftover wood glue
  • Leftover VOC free lacquer

Preparation:

Carefully place the old growth scraps on prepared saw horses and clean them (some people refer to this process in a rather rough and tumble way as de-nailing).

To assure the most delicious surface texture, I recommend rubbing the old growth studs with 60 grit sandpaper first, followed by 120 grit. For the gourmets among us, keep rubbing with 200 grit.

Core the cleaned and prepared old growth scraps at the desired intervals. For the best possible presentation, it is recommended to match the core size exactly with the size of the leftover dowels.

Next, chop the leftover dowels into the appropriate lengths. Shorter pieces feed into the old growth scrap connection. Longer pieces stretch across.

Carefully marinate the short pieces in wood glue and immediately insert into the prepared old growth scraps. Only marinate the ends of the long pieces and immediately place into the prepared cores.

Carefully clamp the ingredients and let rest for at least 12 hours.

Remove clamps and glaze with two coats of the leftover VOC lacquer. It is recommended to let each coat bake at room temperature for about four hours.

Et voilà, a wonderful pot rack entirely made from leftovers!

  

About Marcus de la fleur

Marcus is a Registered Landscape Architect with a horticultural degree from the School of Horticulture at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and a Masters in Landscape Architecture from the University of Sheffield, UK. He developed a landscape based sustainable pilot project at 168 Elm Ave. in 2002, and has expanded his skill set to building science. Starting in 2009, Marcus applied the newly acquired expertise to the deep energy retrofit of his 100+ year old home in Chicago.

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