2nd floor on demand pump

My current modus operatus is wrapping up loose ends. This includes the installation of the on demand hot water pump on the 2nd floor. But this time I did it with confidence, because I had the installation experience from the 1st floor under my belt, including a correction.  And I had the helpful hands of our friend Rubani assisting me.

What is this on demand hot water pump all about? Here is the super short version:

The on demand pump is activated through the push of a button. It pulls water from the hot water line and pushes it into the cold water line. Once the pump senses a rise in the water temperature, it shuts off. This primes all fixtures on the hot water branch the pump is connected to, effectively cutting the delivery time of hot water to seconds.

The on demand hot water pump is just one piece in the puzzle of an efficient domestic hot water delivery system. If you haven’t caught my earlier posts on this system, let me provide you a brief summary with links:

When you are in your bathroom or kitchen and turn on the hot water, do you have to wait for a minute or two (or longer) for the hot water to arrive? Is so, you do not have an efficient hot water delivery system. An efficient delivery system cuts the wait time for hot water to arrive to a few seconds, as mentioned above.

And it does more: It reduces water waste and as such helps with water conservation. It also results in material conservation, as the ground rule for an efficient domestic hot water delivery system is a compact layout and smaller pipe sizes (made possible through the water conservation efforts).

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You find that in an efficient domestic hot water delivery system all pipes are insulated and that it effectively manages structural and behavioral waste of hot water, which again feeds into the water conservation mentioned above.

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An efficient hot water delivery system relies on structured plumbing rather than the traditional trunk-and-branch layout. With a structured plumbing system, the on demand pump is placed at the end of the one hot water branch that services all fixtures.

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About Marcus de la fleur

Marcus is a Registered Landscape Architect with a horticultural degree from the School of Horticulture at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and a Masters in Landscape Architecture from the University of Sheffield, UK. He developed a landscape based sustainable pilot project at 168 Elm Ave. in 2002, and has expanded his skill set to building science. Starting in 2009, Marcus applied the newly acquired expertise to the deep energy retrofit of his 100+ year old home in Chicago.

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