Minisplit cooling startup

Cooling season has started. Our living space has been comfortable in terms of temperature and humidity since we turned off the heating mode on our minisplit back in March. Now it is time to bring the temperature and humidity down a notch so that we can sleep comfortably at night.

The last time the minisplit ran in cooling mode was about eight or nine months ago. Since that time, dust may have accumulated in the condensate collection pan. Once that dust mixes with the first condensate from the heat exchanger coils, it may cake up and block the drain line that is supposed to safely evacuate the water to the outside.

If that is the case, you will notice water droplets on the luvers and a water puddle on the floor under the minisplit.

It’s time to turn the minisplit off and clean that condensate drain line. Or, even better, as a routine maintenance item, preemptively clean the condensate drain line at the beginning of each cooling season.

To do so, find the discharge point of your drain line, which typically would be outside the building. Take a wet/dry shop vacuum with a narrow nozzle. Fit the nozzle over the drain line and proceed to evacuate any water, dust and crud that may have accumulated in the drain line since it last ran in cooling mode. Once the vacuum doesn’t pull any more water or crud out of the drain, start up the minisplit in cooling mode and monitor whether you get any more spillover from the condensate collection plan on the indoor unit. If you do, repeat the cleaning process. If you don’t, great job, and enjoy your cool building interior!

Related posts:

About Marcus de la fleur

Marcus is a Registered Landscape Architect with a horticultural degree from the School of Horticulture at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and a Masters in Landscape Architecture from the University of Sheffield, UK. He developed a landscape based sustainable pilot project at 168 Elm Ave. in 2002, and has expanded his skill set to building science. Starting in 2009, Marcus applied the newly acquired expertise to the deep energy retrofit of his 100+ year old home in Chicago.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.